In India

  

Happy Kids is managing directly two projects there:

  • A kindergarten in Chennai where more than thirty kids from the slums are taken care of during the day thus allowing their elders to go to school rather than having to keep them. There they receive a daily meal, are being pampered and are made to play and do some do-it-yourself. The sponsors receive a six-monthly newsletter.
  • In order to give to a few kids of the slum in Chennai, whose parents are very poor, the opportunity to pursue a complete school education, we submit the proposal of a sponsorship to cover its whole cost. The sponsor receives twice a year the detailed school results and some news of the child and has the possibility to write to him or even to meet him should he travel to Chennai. The sponsorship would stretch over the 10-11years of the education and the total expenditure would amount to about CHF 4'000.- i.e.CHF 400.- per year or CHF 35.- per month. It is obviously a long term project and the sponsor must be fully aware of the duration of his commitment as the child will rely on his support until the end of his education.


And is supporting a third one:

Stop the baby girls fanticide and infanticide

Through the intermediary of Doctor Meeta Singh of Jaipur, we are supporting the NGO SURE which is our partner on the spot. In the State of Rajastan they are fighting against and in view to eventually eliminate this terrible curse that is the selection and destruction of the female foetus and baby girls infanticides. It necessitates overcoming deeply ingrained patriarchal mindsets, viewing sons as benedictions and girls as liabilities particularly due to the disproportionate dowry the tradition demands as compared with parents means and to the belief that only a boy or a close male parent will, when proceeding with the cremation final rites, permit the father’s or mother’s soul to be liberated from the body. The presence of women at the cremation is forbidden and for the soul to be reincarnated in a next life, it is an essential condition that it can leave the dead body. Both practices are illegal but tradition remains stronger than law.

It is also customary that, when a son gets married, the daughter-in-law comes to live with him at his parents’place, thus ensuring them some security in their old days.